NOTE - Dr. Plechner has named his finding an Atypical Cortisol Estrogen Imbalance Syndrome (ACEIS) however the people and animals he has helped have called it Plechner’s Syndrome because it is easier to remember.

Q. WHAT IS THE MEDICAL ICE AGE? ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME).

A. The MEDICAL ICE AGE relates to the gradual breakdown of ourselves, our animals, and our earth. As this gradual breakdown is occurring, a concentration of predisposing factors of poor health are being created. Not only are we seeing entire families of people developing allergies, auto-immunity, and cancer, but we are also seeing even a faster progression of diseases in our animals due to indiscriminant breeding, and breeding without function. The lack of concern for our earth has further allowed for environmental breakdown, contamination of our soils and waters, and the development of an unstable atmosphere. We are potentially destroying our own life line. With this present day destruction, a potentially dangerous cortisol deficiency is being created in our bodies which allows the immune system not to protect people and animals, but instead allows the loss of recognition of the body's own tissue by these cells, resulting in allergies, auto-immunity, and cancer. This is called, ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) may slow down the MEDICAL ICE AGE which threatens our existence.

Q. IN WHAT OTHER WAYS IS ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) DIFFERENT FROM ADDISON'S SYNDROME AND CUSHING'S SYNDROME?

A. ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) involves the INNER LAYER adrenal cortex where ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN hormones are produced. ADDISON'S SYNDROME involves the FIRST LAYER of the adrenal cortex where the hormone ALDOSTERONE is produced which balances Sodium and Potassium levels. CUSHING'S SYNDROME involves the MIDDLE LAYER adrenal cortex where the hormone CORTISOL is produced which is necessary for life. CUSHING'S SYNDROME is the production of too much active (working) cortisol. (A more comprehensive definition of PLECHNER'S SYNDROME will follow *below, and can be located on drplechner.com under, ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) "PLECHNER'S SYNDROME".

A. ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME): is an accumulation of a widely varying group of clinical signs and symptoms that characterize any of a variety of disease abnormalities or conditions which create a specific identifiable pattern in specific hormone and antibody levels in blood serum of several species of mammals. This syndrome is due to a damaged MIDDLE LAYER adrenal cortex because of a genetic predisposition, environmental toxins, or aging. This damaged MIDDLE LAYER adrenal cortex in turn causes a reduction in active (working) cortisol, resulting in an elevated amount of estrogen to be produced by the INNER LAYER adrenal cortex. Normal amounts of cortisol may be present, however this cortisol can be defective or bound and the same estrogenic effect may occur. The cortisol and estrogen imbalance usually presents itself as an altered immunity status with antibody depression present. This not only may result in malabsorption from the intestines, but also allows the immune cells to lose recognition of the body's own tissue and thus attack their own host. These changes in glandular performance allow for a variety of medical effects to occur anywhere from allergies, irritable bowel disease, autoimmunity, uncontrolled tissue growth, and cancer.

Q. WHAT IS CORTISOL?

A. CORTISOL is a hormone that is secreted from the MIDDLE LAYER of the adrenal cortex. It helps the cells in the body to break down fat and proteins into their basic blocks called, "carbohydrates". It is also involved in reducing inflammation in the body. This is probably the most important hormone in the body, and the most feared when medical replacement is suggested.

Q. WHAT ARE THE ADRENAL GLANDS?

A. The ADRENAL GLANDS were originally called the SUPRARENAL GLANDS, because they sit on top of each kidney. They therefore consist of a right and left gland, and are covered by the overlying fatty capsule from the kidney. The cortex of the gland consists of three layers. The first layer produces the hormone ALDOSTERONE, which is not only responsible for electrolyte balance, but works with a hormone from the kidney to regulate blood pressure. The second, or MIDDLE LAYER, produces CORTISOL which has a number of functions and works closely with the pituitary gland. The third layer, or INNER LAYER, produces both ESTROGEN and a male hormone called, ANDROGEN.

Q. WHAT IS A SYNDROME?

A. A SYNDROME is an accumulation of a group of clinical signs and symptoms that characterize a disease abnormality or condition which may create a specific identifiable pattern.

Q. WHAT IS A HORMONE?

A. A HORMONE is a chemically complex substance that is manufactured in an organ or one part of the body that either begins or regulates the function of a group of cells, or a specific organ, that resides in a different location in the body. These substances (HORMONES) are secreted by glands called, ENDOCRINE GLANDS, and travel through the blood stream to their target organs.

Q. WHAT IS ESTROGEN?

A. ESTROGEN is a hormone that is part of a group of estrogenic compounds. With normal amounts of ESTROGEN production present, this hormone helps to develop female secondary sex characteristics in the animal. This hormone can be produced by the ovaries, THE INNER LAYER OF THE ADRENAL CORTEX, testes and placenta. Other forms of ESTROGEN can also be ingested from fruits, vegetables and plastics.

Q. HOW DOES EXCESS ESTROGEN AFFECT MY IMMUNE SYSTEM?

A. Imbalanced CORTISOL allows for the pituitary gland to over-stimulate the production of excess ESTROGEN. This excess estrogen not only causes an inflammation of the lining cells of all arteries in the body, including those arteries to the intestines, but causes the B and T immune cells to become deregulated. It also causes the B cell to reduce its production of antibodies. This in turn causes further turmoil in the gut. When regulated, the B cell protects the body against bacteria and makes protective antibodies to vaccines and other intruders. When the T cell is regulated it protects the body against viruses and plant invaders like yeast and fungi. The hormonal antibody deregulation is why all of these intruders can cause medical effects (illnesses and diseases). Many substances are used to combat these EFFECTS, but while this is being done, the CAUSE must also be corrected, otherwise the EFFECTS will continue. The continuous use of antibiotics and anti-yeast and fungal medications alone will not correct the problem since they can only be managed effectively through replacement and correction of the hormonal antibody imbalance.

Furthermore, when there is an excess of estrogen being produced (or present), it may also cause the following:

  • A chemical binding of both thyroid hormones (T3 and T4).
  • A chemical binding of active (working) CORTISOL and this in turn disallows or prevents the transference of storage thyroid (T4) into active thyroid (T3) in the body.
  • The deregulation of the immune system which causes it not only to be unable to PROTECT the body, but to further lose recognition of self tissue and thus be able to DESTROY the normal tissues in the body.
  • It also causes the immune system to decrease antibody production for protection and from creating protective antibodies from natural invaders and vaccines.
  • It also can lead to an inflammation of the cells lining all the arteries in the body (ENDOTHELIAL CELLS). Inflammation of the arteries may lead to not only strokes and heart attacks, but also to any disease that might respond to a decreased blood flow and lack of proper oxygenation.

Q. WHEN CORTISOL AND ESTROGEN LEVELS ARE IMBALANCED, WHY DOES THE IMMUNE SYSTEM MALFUNCTION?

A. Based upon the review of thousands of serum tests and clinical evidence, the immune system does appear to malfunction. WHEN WE SEE EXCESS ESTROGEN AND DEFECTIVE OR INSUFFICIENT CORTISOL WE ALSO SEE:

  • Reduced numbers of specific immunoglubulins, such as IgA.
  • Frequent clinical symptoms of autoimmune disease.
  • Reduced IgA levels in serum. Immunoglubulins: IgA, IgM, and IgG in particular are tested for and closely monitored.
  • Clinical evidence of new antibody production while the animal is still in endocrine imbalance as demonstrated by new food sensitivities and allergies presented as symptoms during the period of imbalance.

There is strong clinical evidence for immune system deregulation, but presently no clear understanding of the mechanism for this deregulation. There is ample clinical evidence of a return to a normally functioning immune system when the animal's tested hormone levels return to mid-range normal levels.

Q. HOW COULD MY ADRENAL GLANDS BE INJURED, AND COULD THEY BE GENETICALLY DEFECTIVE?

A. There is the possibility that your adrenal glands could be damaged by environmental pollutants and toxins, through administration of vaccines, anesthesia, antibiotics, chemotherapy or any chemical administered to the body, and also due to aging. Defects can also occur in offspring having been passed down from the parents. THE MOST FRAGILE LAYER THAT IS MOST EASILY ADVERSELY AFFECTED IS THE MIDDLE LAYER OF THE ADRENAL CORTEX AND ITS PRODUCTION OF ACTIVE (WORKING) CORTISOL.

Q. WHAT CAN ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) PLECHNER'S SYNDROME POTENTIALLY DO TO THE HEALTH OF MYSELF OR MY PET?

A. ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) may manifest as symptoms of conditions such as, minor chronic disorders like allergies, to major catastrophic diseases such as autoimmunity, uncontrolled tissue growth and cancer. These may all occur due to any event that causes damage to the MIDDLE LAYER of the adrenal cortex, and the resultant loss of production of ACTIVE (WORKING) CORTISOL. ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME)can develop in early life, midlife, old age, at virtually any time.

Q. CAN YOU GIVE ME MORE SPECIFICS AS TO WHY ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) PLECHNER'S SYNDROME IS DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT FROM OTHER DISEASES OF THE ADRENAL CORTEX SUCH AS CUSHING'S SYNDROME OR ADDISON'S SYNDROME?

A. ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) DESCRIBES A DEFICIENCY IN THE PRODUCTION OF CORTISOL FROM THE MIDDLE LAYER ADRENAL CORTEX AND ITS INABILITY TO PROVIDE ACTIVE (WORKING) CORTISOL WHICH IS THE UNDERLYING CAUSE OFATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) AND THE MEDICAL ICE AGE. This shortage of active (working) cortisol leads to a domino effect through the deregulation of thyroid hormones leading to the production of excess ESTROGEN and the deregulation of the immune system and all of the diseases and maladies this resulting faulty immune system creates. NOTE: The diseases are remarkably similar in man and animals. CUSHING'S SYNDROME deals with an EXCESS production of ACTIVE (WORKING) CORTISOL. This excess production, no matter whether it is endogenous (from within the body) or exogenous (from outside the body most likely through ingestion of certain foods, plastics, contaminated water, and medications), may cause clinical symptoms or clinical signs. The side effects of this EXCESS ACTIVE (WORKING) CORTISOL may differ slightly in man and animal. In man what is usually observed is an increase in water consumption, retention, weight gain and swelling in the face shoulders, legs, and ankles. Loss of libido and muscle integrity may also occur. Other effects can be studied on the internet. In canines (dogs), CUSHING'S SYNDROME often presents itself by symptoms such as severe intake of water and increased urine that is not concentrated correctly. There is often sagging of the stomach muscles, and loss of hair without itching. Again, other effects may be studied on the internet.

ADDISON'S SYNDROME is mainly concerned with an imbalance in the first layer of the adrenal cortex and its REDUCED production of ALDOSTERONE, a mineral corticoid hormone. This shortage may lead to an electrolyte defi between SODIUM and POTASSIUM in the blood. Often, this ALDOSTERONE shortage causes vomiting, diarrhea, muscle weakness and a heart that is reduced in size and may stop in contraction. Many other clinical symptoms and signs can be studied on the internet for both man and for dogs.

The human healthcare professionals have written that ADDISON'S SYNDROME may be due to a deficiency of regulatory hormones from ALL THREE LAYERS of the adrenal cortex. The veterinary health care professionals believe that ADDISON'S SYNDROME is the result of a deficiency in hormone production from TWO LAYERS of the adrenal cortex, the FIRST LAYER and SECOND LAYER. ADDISON'S SYNDROME is believed to be either a TWO LAYER OR THREE LAYER adrenal deficiency.

Therefore as a comparison, CUSHING'S SYNDROME is due to EXCESSIVE production of ACTIVE (WORKING) CORTISOL.

ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) is due to REDUCED amounts of ACTIVE (WORKING) CORTISOL, with normal blood serum levels of SODIUM and POTASSIUM which mean the first layer of the adrenal gland is normal. The production of excessive adrenal estrogen further confirms a normal third layer adrenal cortex.

The fact that these hormones (ALDOSTERONE and ADRENAL ESTROGEN) are present relates to whether the CORTISOL and THYROID HORMONES are working, and not the ESTROGEN and ALDOSTERONE, otherwise the electrolytes and the antibodies would not be working. The comparative levels refer to the CORTISOL and IMMUNOGLUBULINS and this is why it is so important to do comparative levels, including those secretions which are regulated by active (working) hormone. This is why testing for ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) is so important. The reason for the development of salivary tests and twenty-four hour urine tests were to measure hormones in these fluids and determine if those hormones that were present are active or bound. It is also very easy to determine this by comparing serum results with those in saliva and urine.

Q. HOW DO I DO THE BLOOD TEST?

A. First of all you will need to have your heath care professional send you or your pet to a laboratory, clinic, or hospital for a blood draw. drplechner.com has all the details on handling the sample, where to send it, and how to ship it so that the sample arrives in a refrigerated state.

Q. WHY DO I NEED TO USE THE LABORATORY THAT YOU RECOMMEND?

A. This is one of the few laboratories in the United States that can do a TOTAL estrogen, and knows how the serum sample needs to be prepared for shipping and processing. I have used four laboratories over forty years and I have learned that if these tests are not done correctly, I cannot assist your veterinarian or physician effectively, and I do not want the "extra mile that you have travelled" in attempting to get a diagnosis to be a health care disappointment for either you or for your pet. Please note that I am NOT compensated in any way by the use of this laboratory.

Q. HOW DOES A VETERINARIAN OR PHYSICIAN INTERPRET SERUM TESTS FOR ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME)?

A. There is a contact button on drplechner.com which is available for consultation with your health care professional. Just push the consultation button.

Q. IS THERE TREATMENT AVAILABLE? IF SO, HOW DO I GET IT?

A. There will always be treatment available to you through your own health care professional. I will be more than glad to suggest therapy based upon the test results while also suggesting any nutritional or dietary changes that may be helpful. This treatment program is not only set up to correct hormonal imbalances, but to also look at foods, enzymes, nutraceuticals and availability of nutrients to the body via the gut. The entire program is designed to be "WHOLEISTIC". Remember, many healthcare professionals will treat the EFFECTS of the illness or disease, but not the ROOT CAUSE cause of it.

Q. ARE STERIOD AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPIES SAFE, ESPECIALLY FOR LONG-TERM USE FOR ANIMALS AND FOR HUMANS?

A. Please keep in mind that THE MOST IMPORTANT HORMONE IN THE BODY IS CORTISOL AND IT SHOULD NOT BE FEARED BY PATIENTS OR THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY. In correcting the Endocrine-Immune Imbalance caused byATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) USING CORTISOL REPLACEMENT THERAPY TO REPLACE THE BODY'S OWN NATURALLY OCCURING PRODUCTION OF WORKING CORTISOL, COUPLED WITH THYROID REPLACEMENT THERAPY, WILL GUARANTEE THAT THE SMALL AMOUNT OF CORTISOL IS UTILIZED AND BROKEN DOWN BY THE BODY IN A TWENTY-FOUR HOUR PERIOD. THYROID REPLACEMENT THERAPY MUST BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH CORTISOL REPLACEMENT THERAPY TO ENSURE THAT THERE IS NO RESIDUAL CORTISOL THAT WOULD BUILD UP AND BECOME AN OVERDOSE.

Please also keep in mind ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME), THE ROOT CAUSE OF THE ENDOCRINE-IMMUNE IMBALANCE, DEMONSTRATES AN IMBALANCE BETWEEN A LACK OF WORKING CORTISOL AND EXCESS ESTROGEN. THIS IMBALANCE NOT ONLY DEREGULATES THE THYROID, BUT ALSO DEREGULATES THE IMMUNE SYSTEM AND IS THERBY THE ROOT CAUSE OF CATASTROPHIC ILLNESSES AND DISEASES WHICH INCLUDE ALLERGIES, AUTO-IMMUNITY, AND CANCER.

***SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS***

FOOD SENSITIVITIES WILL UNDERMINE THE SUCCESS OF THE TREATMENT PLAN. Remember, it is possible return ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) hormone levels to normal ranges with oral medications, but if you, or your pet, are still showing signs of problems, you are fighting an existing food sensitivity. Normally an injection of a cortisol replacement can be given to the patient with ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME), and if in 2 to 3 days there is no improvement, a dietary change is indicated. drplechner.com may help you with this. If food sensitivities are present, DO NOT keep trying different foods because without properly identifying ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (ACIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) in the patient, the deregulated immune cells will make antibodies to these foods, and these new antibodies will always react to those foods even after you have corrected the mechanism of immune imbalance due to the ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME).

GENETIC CONCERNS: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PREGNANCY PLANNING FOR BOTH ANIMALS AND FOR HUMANS.

In animals it is very easy to test the parents to see if their offspring will be normal. With ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME), if both parents are deficient in the same area the deficiency will usually be concentrated in their offspring. This is not to say do not breed these animals, it is to say do not breed them to each other. Both animal parents can be off in different areas and dilute out their problem in their offspring. Dr. Plechner has done this for many years and has shown conscientious breeders how to develop healthy pets for the future thereby avoiding a MEDICAL ICE AGE.

Obviously with people, this is a different situation. What people can do however, is to do the ATYPICAL CORTISOL ESTROGEN IMBALANCE SYNDROME (ACEIS) (PLECHNER'S SYNDROME) test, determine what they will be passing on to their child, and as soon as the infant's maternal antibodies have disappeared, check the infant for any imbalance as a preventative and get these imbalances corrected before any of the juvenile diseases begin. The test will also indicate whether the infant will be able to successfully receive vaccines and make protective antibodies without a severe reaction occurring.

Website content text, Copyright, Dr. Alfred J. Plechner, 2008, All Rights Reserved.

Editor: Sheila Doan